RULE 17: Omit Needless Words.

"Uttering a word is like striking a note on the keyboard of the imagination." - Ludwig Wittgenstein
Recent Tweets @omtndlsswrds

This site is currently being worked over… stay tuned for details. 

by Blake J. Daniel

Ray Bradbury begins his last-published essay, a piece in The New Yorker (June, 2012), with these words: “When I was seven or eight years old, I began to read the science-fiction magazines that were brought by guests into my grandparents’ boarding house in Waukegan, Illinois.” 

It’s telling that the late science-fiction author, who would have turned 92 this year, began an essay in the prestigious New Yorker not with a statement referencing his pedigree but rather with a hat-tip to both his youth and his grandparents.  Such a man was Ray Bradbury! 

Read More

by Andy Scott

Part II: An Examination of Spaced and Paul

            If Benji Dunn was the first of Simon Pegg’s characters to inhabit my consciousness, then Tim Bisley is perhaps the closest of all Pegg’s characters to a personification of my own repressed and pseudo-nerd psyche. Tim is the slacker comic book artist from the short-lived TV series Spaced, Pegg’s first foray into mainstream British culture and his gateway into future work with various Hollywood projects. It is the character of Tim, as well as Graeme Willy of Paul that are the closest manifestations to Pegg’s own true geek, and these characters allow Pegg to publicly explore the various social influences that have been so strong in his formation. Most prominent in both projects are references to Star Wars, comic book enthusiasm and an interest in the paranormal.

Read More

 

by Andy Scott

A Review of Nerd Do Well [1]

Simon Pegg first came into my consciousness as Benji Dunn, the nerdy-capable tech whiz who aids and abets Tom Cruise’s Ethan Hunt in the Mission: Impossible series. Playing a lovable, dweeby scamp who shies away from violence in favor of technological trickery, Pegg navigated his way into my heart. And that was before he gave me zombies. Benji is an innocent nerd sucked irrevocably into a bigger story, and it is this same subtle but lovable nerdiness that Pegg explores and delivers in his autobiography, Nerd Do Well: A Small Boy’s Journey to Becoming a Big Kid. [2] In detailing the particulars from his upbringing in rural England to starring in some of our generations’ funniest movies, Pegg makes it clear that his journey from boy to kid was simply unavoidable.

Read More

by Eric Meckley

On November 4th, 2008 I was in my apartment in Evanston, Illinois. As far as I remember, I wasn’t watching the results of the Presidential Election. Whether I was paying any attention or not, the events of the night made little or no lasting impression on me. What took place that night hangs no more vibrantly in my mind than the facts I learned about the Whiskey Rebellion in fourth grade, the first time my particularly desolate corner of northwestern Pennsylvania was mentioned in our history book. I was nearing the nadir of my political disaffection. I did not vote in the election.

Read More